Celebrate Seniors in Long Term Care

Long Term Care should continue to celebrate it’s seniors. In doing so, we might just change the narrative associated with long term care.

I read with great interest John O’Connor’s article “10 Bold Predictions About the Year Ahead in Long Term Care” that appeared in McKnight’s Long Term Care. Unfortunately, 9/10 of the predictions are negative.

Sadly, his predictions are not off base.  Therefore, what needs to happen to turn-around the negative narrative about nursing homes?

One possible answer I found also appeared in McKnight’s. GaryTetz discussed the idea of a growing societal appreciation of seniors. Could this be true? Is society developing a stronger appreciation for seniors?  If we genuinely valued seniors, our long term care system would not be in such a mess. Accordingly, we would have a vital and thriving long term care system that isn’t fighting for survival every day.

None of us individually has the power to change societal views or unwind the overwhelming challenges in long term care.  In addition, the negativity that swirls around the long term care industry can hijack our energies and make us forget why we work in this business.

For this reason, we must remember that we have the power and responsibility to celebrate and honor our seniors.

Changing the Long Term Care Narrative

An organization that honors seniors is “One Dream.” Located in the Chicago area, One Dream is a not for profit that was created in 2014 to bring happiness, meaning, and excitement into the lives of deserving, lower-income seniors. They make dreams come true for seniors and restores dignity and hope.

Bethesda Rehab and Senior Care, a skilled nursing community in Chicago, celebrates the creativity of their seniors by hosting an annual art exhibition, showcasing their works of fine art.

The Birches Assisted Living in Clarendon Hills, IL, has their assisted living residents write blogs for their website.  As an example, this is a tremendous way to honor the wisdom of their seniors.

In conclusion, the Long Term Care Industry should drive the narrative about the vibrant lives of their seniors.  To that end, let’s continue to celebrate our seniors more loudly and boldly than ever before!

It would be amazing to see more positives on the McKnight’s list for 2021.

Julie has worked in Aging Services for over 30 years and has been a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator since 1990. She is a Certified Master Trainer with the AGE-u-cate Training Institute. Through her company Enlighten Eldercare,  Julie provides training and educational programs on elder caregiving for family and professional caregivers.  In addition, she is an instructor and the Interim Director of Gerontology at Northern Illinois University and lives in the Chicago Northwest Suburb of Mount Prospect, IL.

Aging Services Future Focus

On the brink of a new decade, I contemplate what the next ten years will look like for the aging services industry. Reflecting on the past provides me some hope for the future. In some respects, we have come a long way.  By the same token, we should maintain a future focus and continue to develop more strategies that support the quality of living of frail elders.

One future focus could be to equip our caregivers with best practice strategies to respond to resident behaviors utilizing therapeutic approaches. 

We realized years ago that physical and chemical restraints weren’t the answer. The emergence of Compassionate Touch, Music & Memory, and Joy for All Companion Pets are best practice possibilities. All of these interventions provide a non-pharmacological approach to improving quality of life.  Expressive touch, music, and pets to love address basic human needs of connection, inclusion, and purpose, to name a few.

A second future focus could be to educate our employees about the process of aging and dementia to demystify, normalize, and create an environment of understanding and acceptance.

Can we say that our caregivers understand the process of aging? In addition, do they comprehend and empathize with the struggle of living with memory loss and sensory changes?  To that end, employee education creates empathetic caregivers, and that leads to better care. In the same way,  this is also true for family members.  More understanding leads to better care partners.

As one example, the educational program Dementia Live provides caregivers with an inside-out understanding of what it is like to live with dementia. It is a powerful experience for employees and family members.

Workforce

A third future focus could be to cultivate a revitalized workforce.

The workforce challenges that face the aging services industry seems overwhelming and hopeless.  But keep this in mind, nurses did not take care of post-heart transplant patients twenty years ago in skilled nursing.  We rose to the challenge. Nothing is impossible.  Providers alone cannot entirely solve this problem. However, there are things to do that can get the ball rolling.

In conclusion, while the future may look daunting, consider how far we have come over the previous 10-20 years. Celebrate the evolution of an industry that was once “warehousing,” and face the future with boldness and ample self-care, we will need it.

Julie has worked in Aging Services for over 30 years and has been a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator since 1990. She is a Certified Master Trainer with the AGE-u-cate Training Institute. Through her company Enlighten Eldercare,  Julie provides training and educational programs on elder caregiving for family and professional caregivers.  In addition, she is an instructor and the Interim Director of Gerontology at Northern Illinois University and lives in the Chicago Northwest Suburb of Mount Prospect, IL.

Dementia and a New Normal Holiday Celebration

The holiday season can be overwhelming for people with dementia. Create a new normal holiday celebration so that everyone is merry and bright!

I visited a friend this week who lives in a wonderful memory support community. I arrived with a flurry- two Christmas packages in one hand, my dog on a leash in the other,  and my work bag flung over my shoulder. My friend was waiting near the front door.  As the other residents caught a glimpse of my dog, they rushed to extend their greetings. Consequently, I almost dropped the packages, my dog startled, and the commotion created an overwhelming and confusing scene, even for me.

My arrival caused my friend to become anxious. He was ready to flee and needed to separate himself from the chaos.  He wasn’t sure where to go, so we just started walking down the hallway. Eventually, we came upon a place to sit, and he told me that he was sorry, and he only had about 15 minutes until his next appointment.

He sent a loud and clear message that it was all too much. I tried to create a festive holiday experience for my friend, and I over-did it. Not to mention, I know better.

A New Normal Holiday Experience

This experience tied so perfectly into the message at church today. The holidays can make you want to look back, reminisce, and wish for the days of yore. Our hearts tug to reach back and relive the past. And, we want those we love with us, just as they were in the past. Unfortunately, life’s changes often make that impossible.

Reminiscing is normal and therapeutic. However, living in the past is unhealthy. The holidays should inspire hope and joy.  Acceptance can be difficult, but it is our best bet for having an enjoyable holiday experience.

In Kathy Dreyer’s November article, she referenced helpful holiday tips for caregivers.  In the same way, I want to offer suggestions from the perspective of a person with dementia.

Please accept that:

  • I may not be able to handle large group events
  • I might feel blue
  • activities of the past (such as cookie-baking) may be beyond my capability
  • I may not feel comfortable being away from my familiar environment for an extended period
  • I need a new normal to celebrate the holidays

In conclusion, holiday overload can be distressing for people living with dementia. Peace and blessings to all who strive to incorporate a new normal holiday.

Julie has worked in Aging Services for over 30 years and has been a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator since 1990. She is a Certified Master Trainer with the AGE-u-cate Training Institute. Through her company Enlighten Eldercare,  Julie provides training and educational programs on elder caregiving for family and professional caregivers.  In addition, she is an instructor and the Interim Director of Gerontology at Northern Illinois University and lives in the Chicago Northwest Suburb of Mount Prospect, IL.

Stigma and Alzheimer’s Disease: Support and Understanding

The stigma associated with having Alzheimer’s disease and/or any other type of dementia can create a profoundly isolating, painful experience. As a person starts to go through some of the early symptoms, such as memory loss, difficulty in completing everyday tasks, and not being able to follow conversations, that person may be reluctant to share these symptoms with family, friends, or a doctor out of fear of knowing what might come next. Part of that fear can be tied to the stigma that has accompanied Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

According to the World Alzheimer’s Report for 2019, stigma takes many forms. It can occur when a person with dementia is no longer accepted by friends due to misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease. Without a realistic understanding about the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, people may misinterpret behaviors, thinking that someone with Alzheimer’s disease is doing something (e.g., wandering, being paranoid) on purpose. Also, there can be misinterpretation over the abilities of a person with a diagnosis, thinking that the person can no longer make any decisions and does not want to be involved in the care planning. These misconceptions can result in leaving that person out of the conversation and create a worse environment.

Despite the lingering effects of stigma of having Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, there are many efforts underway to alleviate the stigma and replace it with understanding and much-needed support. There are Dementia Friendly communities in more than half of the United States currently as a part of the Dementia Friendly America network . Dementia Friendly communities are created to support individuals living with dementia and those caring for them. The communities create sector-wide networks to keep persons with dementia engaged and connected.

The Alzheimer’s Association also serves to educate the community and support persons living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers. Through statewide chapters and the national office, there is more information about the disease, as well as ways to cope and find support for dealing with stigma.

The Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) provides information and support to promote health of older adults. The CDC also provides recommendations for addressing stigma associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias. Some of their recommendations include encouraging persons with dementia and their family members to discuss any concerns with their health care provider, promote engagement of persons with dementia in senior centers and adult day care programs, and support opportunities to help the general public’s understanding about Alzheimer’s disease through education and information in public settings. A good approach is to keep positive and provide information. The important thing is to meet people where they are, those with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s disease, as well as those who need more information, and offer support for both.

Kathy Dreyer, Ph.D., is the Director of Strategic Projects at AGE-u-cate® Training Institute, which develops and delivers innovative research-based aging and dementia training programs such as Dementia Live® and Compassionate Touch®, for professional and family caregivers; kathy.dreyer@ageucate.com

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